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20121222
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
't happen. senate so there's nothing for the house to vote on. as i pointed out july 25th. democratic bill is, quote, a revenue measure that didn't originate in the house so it's got no chance whatsoever of that's what i said july 25th. the only reason we ever allowed that vote on that proposal is i said at that time, we knew it didn't pass constitutional muster. and if democrats were really serious, they had proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires, and as i called on them to do again last week. to repeat, the so-called senate bill is nothing more than a glorified sense of the senate resolution. let's put that talking point aside. last night i told the president we'd be happy to look at whatever he proposes but the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here and, as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. republicans aren't about to write a blank check for anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that wouldn't be fair to the american people. that having been sai
strategist and a former campaign aide for president george w. bush, julie roginsky is former political adviser to new jersey senate frank lautenberg. good to see you both. >> good to see you. gregg: didi, smoot-holly was passed decades ago for the purpose of putting tariff limits on incoming products. do we need to reexplore that? >> yeah. this was, this was back in the '60s. i mean, this was ancient history. why should these workers who get paid very well also get on top of that the booty of $15-$16,000 more. for what? this is just an extra fee and extra goodies per container. what this was back in the '60s was a way to help there be more workers, it was a deal done with the unions and the ports so they wouldn't use as much equipment and so they wouldn't be as efficient so they could keep their union workers. it's outdated, and it's wrong and, really, it's terrible -- gregg: julie, what do you think? >> i think if we're talking about smoot-holly which is a different issue just raised by didi, but, yeah, i think the president will probably intervene, and he did last time on the west co
and fierce winds. the unrelenting heat also proved deadly in the mid lant tick and midwest states after july storms killed 22 people across the area. it knocked out power leaving millions sweltering. heat related deaths climbed to 20 in the chicago area. hurricane isaac making land fall in new orleans on the eve of the 7th anniversary of hurricane katrina. it will made land fall as a category 1 hurricane. the slow moving storm went through low lying coastal areas. plackman's parish it inundated communities in arkansas. a sight in the sky over phoenix as a massive dust storm blows in. winds gusting up to 40 mills an hour bringing in dust and sand from the desert. 2012 also saw the birth of a super storm a devastating hurricane that collided with a powerful system from canada. sandy made land fall in south jersey in october. flooding beach communities to highways and washing iconic board walks into the ocean. the downtown skyline fell dark and homes went up in flames. areas of long island staten island filled with debris. sandy claims at least 100 lives and changed the landscape of the jersey
years. it took hard work on the part of me and julie tate of the washington post and gabriel banks who was my researcher and she was living in los angeles and the three of us trying deleted everything and i found her fill. i can't tell all of that story because to protect her not because of the book but because she had an abusive ex-husband and we don't want to find her. in any case -- we started with just the name genevieve. i found -- a wedding announcement in the new york times ran a lot of bells because it had indonesia in it, conn. in it, obama in his memoir starts about taking it up to her family's estates in the pond in wealthy areas in connecticut. it stuck with me and studied court records, i found another name for her and tracked her down and made the call. we have a lot of conversations since then. >> host: you write in your book, quoting vino mahmoud. he had never had many black friends. i saw that switch happen most markedly during the period that i was very close to him. he was the most deliberate person i ever met in terms of constructing his own identity and his achieve
the mood. you could use this in july. this bowl to me is so beautiful. this is from zee gallery. this is under $100. this would look great anywhere in your house. when you combine it with this beautiful runner, and i took these westhome vases and dressed them up with tulips. these are from a supermarket. if you take a whole bunch, again, more is more. put them in there. it's the unexpected. it makes it look just fun and festive. >> this looks very spring here too. >> it does. or it could be, you know, again for new year's, any time of the year. >> very fresh. >> it's combining the unexpected to make it festive and fun. >> okay. last but not least, this is table that keeps giving. >> this keeps on giving. i think it's fun to have the center piece also be gifts for guests. so the first thing i thought it for the host memento, this is a monogrammed tray. it says happy 2013. >> this can be there year round. >> exactly. fun to have a bunch of them. this can be in your center. then i love the idea of these mint julip cups. i monogram them for each guest. they don't have to be. filling
that vote back on july 25th, the democratic bill is, quote, a revenue measure that didn't originate in the house so it's got no chance whatsoever of becoming law, end quote. that's what i said back on july 25th. the only reason we ever allowed that vote on that proposal is i said at that time was that we knew it didn't pass constitutional muster. and the democrats were really serious, they would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires and as i called on them to do again last week. to repeat, the so-called nate bill is nothing more than a glorified sense of the senate resolution. so let's put that convenient talking point aside from here on out. last night i told the president we'd be happy to look at whatever he proposes but the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here and, as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that wouldn't be fair to the american peop
. sweltering heat baked the nation this summer. march and july set u.s. records as the hottest of all time. number seven, western wildfire. >> oh, my god. there's smoke in the air. >> a heat wave helped fuel a string of wildfires that charred the west. colorado experienced two of the state's largest and most destructive wildfires ever. number six, the derecho in june. >> it began in iowa, moved through illinois, indiana, ohio and moved into washington, d.c. it's just a fast-moving, longlasting violent thunderstorm complex. >> after charging 800 miles, 22 were dead and 5 million were without power. number five, the dallas 22. there's an old myth that tornadoes don't hit big cities. >> it was so scary. remind you of "the wizard of oz" when the tornado hit and everything going around and around. >> caused nearly $1 billion worth of damage within 24 hours. number four, deadliest tornadoes. >> take it away from us, lord. >> tornadoes took up three slots in our top ten countdown. but this was the deadliest. march 2nd and 3rd, 70 confirmed tornadoes killed 7 people in the northwest. hurricane isa
and outs of capitol hill. >> julie watches c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service if by your television provider. >> "washington journal" continues. host: lawrence yun is the chief economist and senior vice president for the national association of realtors. how would you assess the housing markets today? guest: thanks for inviting me, peter. housing market has turned for the better in 2012. the home sales overall look to be about 10% better this year versus last. home prices on average are up about 5%. in some parts of the country, it's up better than 20%. you are seeing places like las vegas and miami where it's about a 10% gain. there's local market variation, but overall the housing market is recovering. host: if the u.s. government and american taxpayers go over the so called "fiscal cliff" what do you foresee for? the for? guest: the fiscal cliff is going to shave off about 4% of gdp, so that the national economic growth. currently is growing about 2%. you can do very simple mathematics. and we are back in a recessi
.l >> it is a great resource for anyone to know the ins and outs of capitol hill. >> julie watches c-span on verizon. brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> dan burton is retiring from congress. he talked with c-span about his past investigations of the clinton investigation and the oversight role of congress. this is 30 minutes. >> how would you say the state is? >> it has changed a great deal. it is not the same as when i came 1983. there seemed to be more comedy. tip o'neill was speaker. i will never forget he was the first time he was on the floor raising cane with democrats. and he came down and started giving me the dickens. after that we became very good friends and played golf together. bob michael was a wonderful leader. there was a spirit of camaraderie even though we had differences politically then that we do not have now. now it is much more combative. i have a lot of friends on the democratic side of the aisle, very good friends. as far as working things out is not as easy as it used to be. >> what are some of the root causes? >> i think and i am not pointin
begin with a traffic stop back in july. >> i don't have marijuana. >> i don't smoke marijuana. >> gregg: a female officer was then called to the scene to perform a cavity search on both women. the officers say it was necessary because they saw the suspect throw what may have been marijuana cigarettes out of the car. women say they were molested, their rights were violated. was the search unconstitutional or did police really have probable cause here. joey jackson, vicky ziegler, former prosecutors. very sensitive subject. a lot depends on the videotape. i not sure you can discern critical issues? >> there is a lot we don't know certainly. when i looked at the video i saw some invasive procedures. it appeared that this female officer had her fingers in the backside of this woman. she went underneath her pants, underneath, we don't know if it was under her underwear, it appeared it was more than a frisk. more than a pat down allowed by the law. terry versus ohio you are allowed to pat down if you believe there is contraband but this was egregious. it was done on a public highway in front
and color-coded. >> you're wrapped? everything? >> who spends their fourth of july holiday wrapping christmas gifts? >> i have been known to buy in summer sales. >> when were you finished? >> early. but, if you're not, "gma" has great tips for you. places you can still, today, last-minute, go and shop and grab really good deals. we have a list. stay with us. we're checking it out. >>> is ma in her kerchief and i in my cap? our all-star version. never heard it like that before. >> no, never. >> sounds terrific. >>> first this story. the dentist who fired his long-time assistant because he says she was too attractive. she's had a spotless employment record, she had no romantic interest many him in him at all. but the judges backed the boss. good morning, linsey. >> reporter: good morning, lara. you remember the song i'm too sexy? apparently, it's too sexy for your job. parentally, you can can a person for being ir resistibly attractive. imagine being fired because you're just too sexy. that's what 32-year-old melissa nelson said happened to her. after working for a den tis for ten yea
for liberation who elected a pro-american government in july, who sought greater u.s. assistance to treat their wounded, train their national security forces come to secure their borders, build their democratic institutions, and expand the rule of law. libyans did not want al qaeda militias running amok in large parts of the country. that is the reality we now face. this is the broader failure of the administration's so-called life footprint approach toward libya. regardless of whom the president nominates to serve in his cabinet, we will continue to ask these questions and demand answers and accountability. i would like to concur with senator mccain. i thought the report was very detailed and the recommendations good and solid in terms of how to better understand the intelligence and run it, how to improve security on the ground, and there is much we can learn from this report. here is what we do know -- we know nothing about president obama before, during, and after the attack. they're making two movies about his use of in the bin laden rate, and he deserves that. it was well executed a
: spengler's criminal past dates back to july, 1980, the death of his grandmother. >> spengler lived alone at this house for over 40 years. she was found dead at the floor of the dwelling by her grandson, william spengler, who lives next door. spengler discovered the body at 12:45 p.m. police say mrs. spengler was beaten with some type of blunt instrument. >> reporter: that brunt instrument was a hammer. he'd of manslaught. he remained in prison until 1988. spengler's mother had recently passed away but that fact alone hardly begins to offer answers. >> we don't have an exact reason why but looking at the history, obviously this is an individual that has a lot of problems to kill his grandmother some 30-odd years ago. >> and we're learning more about the firefighters who were killed yesterday. one of them, michael chiaperini named firefighter of the year in his department. he was helping those affected by hurricane sandy. >>> residents of newtown, connecticut are trying to find joy this christmas on the heels of that massive shooting that happened at sandy hook elementary school where a gu
jefferson seemed to have changing opinions on god. both he, though, and john adams died on july 4th, 50 years to the day of the declaration of independence. >> well, it is coincidence, but john quincy adams, who was president at the time, thought it was a sign of divine benevolence, that somehow the fathers would be gathered up, the apotheosis of adams and jefferson on the 50th anniversary in 1826. and it is a little -- i mean, if you wrote that in a novel, you know, you'd kick it back and say a little too -- they're guilding the lily unquestionably. but i think it was also the beginning of our first moment of kind of founder chic that, you know, they died -- i think at that point there was only one remaining signer alive. there were very few. and so the fact that they were gone was a kind of mythological almost benediction to what they worked so hard for. and i think -- i wonder sometimes whether john adams would ultimately be pleased that he had to share the headline or think, you know, dammit, jefferson did it again, you know, he stepped on my story. bush 41, who is giving his wife r
. number eight, summer heat wave. sweltering heat baked the nation this summer. march and july set u.s. records as the hottest of all time. number seven, western wildfires. >> smoke in the air. >> the heat wave helped fuel a string of wildfires that hit the west. number six, the deratio in june. >> it began in iowa, moved through illinois, indiana, ohio and moved into washington, d.c. it took a fast moving long lasting violent thunderstorm complex. >> after charging 800 miles, 22 were dead and 5 million were without power. number five, the dallas 22. there is an old myth that tornadoes don't hit big cities. april 3rd proved otherwise when twisters hit dallas. >> scary. it was so scary. it reminds you of the wizard of oz when the tornado hit and everything just going around and around. >> 22 tornadoes caused a billion dollars worth of damage in 24 hours. number four, deadliest tornado. tornadoes took up three spots in our top ten countdown, but this event was the deadliest. march 2nd and 3rd, 70 confirmed tornadoes killed 40 people in the midwest. number three, hurricane isaac. hurric
from julie. why can't the government run the country the way i run my household? i pay my bills on time and i have a budget. that's a tweet. >> eric: stop being dems and republicans, citizens of one country. that's a fantastically accurate treat. it's both sides pointing the finger. kind of laughing, going back to the districts, they're all making their 175 grand a year, they're spending 124 days on vacation. the cadillac insurance policy. >> juliet: let's go to other headlines. russian president putin is trying to make a political point at the expense of orphans. just a short time ago, putin signed a bill that bans americans from adopting russian children. it's retaliation for a u.s. law cracking down on russian human rights violators here in the united states. one american family in the process of adopting is now left in limbo. >> these children are not available to international adoption until after they've been on a domestic registry for at least eight months. now, in our son's case, 22 families, russian families, came to see him and rejected him because of his blood line. >> juliet
attack. tell us about your injuries. >> july 2011. i lost my left leg completely the worst part was the inection ifs i spent seven months in the hospital battling those. >> you were seven months in the hospital and as soon as you arrived back herance i understand it on u.s. soil you were 53 days in the intensive care unit. and christina, you were by his side. >> yeah. >> the entire time. >> yes. >> every day. that couldn't have been easy. >> no, but i mean when somebody you care about is that sick what do you do? you don't walk away. >> she dropped everything like quit school. left her job. she take care of me. >> you guys are young. it's incredible to have this experience and to have this level of dedication to each other at this age. have you been through a real trial. so, derek, what did you think last week when you heard that you had won this contest for your dream wedding? >> i guess the past 17 months have been all about me. i know it's our wedding but now it's time for the next chapter where she is in the focus. >> what's your dream wedding going to include? >> everything
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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